Who is responsible for your fire doors?

Fire doors are an often-overlooked safety feature in any building; however, they can extend the time you have to escape in an emergency. Blocking off the spread of the fire for enough time to potentially save lives.

Fire doors should be present and well maintained in all buildings of the following nature, but who is responsible for them? By knowing who is responsible, you are better equipped to report any issues or concerns, which could in turn save your life and that of others.

Five Simple Steps can be found on our Pacific Social Medias, which is a quick and easy check that will bring to light any immediate issues making it easier to have the important conversations with the responsible persons. It should not be in place of a full inspection by a qualified engineer, if you would like to book this, contact us today, a survey is free and a quotation will be sent quickly and to your budget.

Public Buildings

The Building Manger has a responsibility under the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 (FSO) to ensure that employees and users of their properties are safe, this includes maintaining and installing fire doors.

Listed properties and buildings with heritage matters can be come complicated, particular attention to detail and expertise is required here. Pacific have successfully worked in many public listed buildings, including some of the United Kingdom’s most notable museums and attractions.

Hospitals

Hospital and Healthcare Management hold the responsibility of fire safety under the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 (FSO) to ensure that all those present within the hospital, both staff and patients, are kept safe.

Hospitals can be difficult environments for fire doors, with high footfall and heavy usage. Regular inspections are therefore required on all doors to ensure they remain in good working condition in the event of any emergency.

Private Rented Housing

Your landlord will hold responsibility under the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 (FSO) to ensure that the property you live within is safe under emergency conditions. Their responsibility includes the requirement for a fire risk assessment in all non-domestic areas of the building including communal areas and hallways of multiple occupation buildings.

Landlords can be criminally prosecuted if they do not fulfil their duties, so make sure the conversation is had and if the work is not complete report immediately.

Council and Social Housing

Social Landlords (this could be the local authorities in your area, or housing associations) hold the responsibility of fire doors under the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 (FSO). Like private rentals, their responsibility extends to the requirement for a fire risk assessment in all non-domestic buildings, including common areas and hallways.

Social Landlords and Social Housing Associations can be criminally prosecuted if they do not fulfil their duties, so report the issue if you do not feel as though your requests are being handled.

Pacific are proficient in fire door inspections and remediations in residential properties of all natures, working around specific times and requirements to remain sensitive to occupants of the building.

Offices, Shops and Industrial Units

Building owners, employers and operators have a responsibility under the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 (FSO) to ensure that employees and users of their properties are safe.

Buildings that require particular attention in this area are those of mixed use, where businesses and residents co-exist. Such as flats above shops. Pacific have worked in both the retail and residential sectors and have experience in pointing out these areas of concern and thereafter seeing to them appropriately.

Care Homes and Sheltered Housing

Care homes and sheltered housing providers hold the responsibility of fire door maintenance, under the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) order 2005 (FSO) to ensure that all patients are kept safe.

If you are concerned about the fire doors within a building of this nature, you must report it immediately to those responsible. Buildings of this nature usually house vulnerable occupants, that require fire doors to extend their time of escaping in the event of an emergency.

Hotels and Guest Houses

Hotel and Guest House Owners hold the responsibility under the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 (FSO).

Owners must ensure that fire doors are in place, as well as signposted fire plans, to ensure that guests who may be disorientated in an emergency can effectively vacate the premises.

Schools, Universities and Colleges

Schools, Universities and Colleges hold the responsibility under the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 (FSO) to ensure all students and staff are safe at all times.

Areas such as this can be complex, with high footfall and residential considerations, which will also fall under control of the education provider. Pacific have experience in the University and School sector in particular, undertaking work on both public and private areas.

It is important to report issues and furthermore, report to the relevant authorities when you feel your complaints are not being dealt with. As the article states, landlords of residential properties can be prosecuted if they do not fulfil their duties. Fire doors are a serious matter that should not be left to chance.

Contact us today to book a free survey of your building and to receive a full quotation on any work required. Pacific are proficient in many building uses, fabrics and complexities.

0870 850 8404 | [email protected]

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